Hotel Racine

Hotel Racine

Hotel Racine ca. 1910 by Racine photographer Bishop

Hotel Racine ca. 1910 by Racine photographer Bishop

This building is too interesting just to have a few postcards on the site!

The first Hotel Racine was built in 1894 and torn down in 1925.

Here is a short biography of a Hotel Racine manager, George Hopper.

I found this very vivid account of a society ball at the Hotel Racine on January 2, 1895.

Hotel Racine and post office, 1911

Hotel Racine and post office, 1911

Hotel Racine and the post office, 1911, reverse

Hotel Racine and the post office, 1911, reverse

Hotel Racine, 1905

Hotel Racine, 1905

Hotel Racine, 1905, reverse, addressed to Miss Cecile Tavernia, Chronic Insane Asy., Wauwatosa, Wis., Aug. 16, 1905

Hotel Racine, 1905, reverse, addressed to Miss Cecile Tavernia, Chronic Insane Asy., Wauwatosa, Wis., Aug. 16, 1905

 


This clipping is from 1908:

Dr. Marshall Dies in West

Former Proprietor of Hotel Racine Succumbs to Lingering Illness in Redlands, Cal — Survived by Wife and Daughters

Dr. John M. Marshall, former proprietor of the Hotel Racine, died on the evening of November 19, at his home on Brookside avenue, Redlands, California.

Mr. Marshall was one of the most successful hotel men in the country, and when he had charge of the Hotel Racine he conducted it in a first class and business like manner, and sold out at a profit of about $8,000. He was a man upright and honorable in every transaction, and with the guests of the house was popular, never losing an opportunity to make them comfortable.

He sold the hotel here to Mr. Solloway and went to Richmond, Indiana, where he conducted a hotel; thence to Butte, Montana, and came back east again. Last spring he went to Redlands, where he bought the Rev. D. H. Gillan ranch and residence at Brookside, expecting to make that his home.

With Mrs. Marshall he spent last summer in Europe and returned to Redlands late last September. Soon after he was taken ill and his decline was rapid.

Dr. Marshall was a native of Ohio, and at the time of his demise was 64 years of age. Deceased is survived by Mrs. Marshall and two daughters, Mrs. S. B. Williams of Nashville, Tenn., and Mrs. W. S. Longford of Atlanta. Ga.



Look at this building I saw in Dallas! I was taking a cab from the airport to the convention center and all of a sudden, I thought I was dreaming — it looks just like the first Hotel Racine, right down to the different stone used in the first story. Apparently it is called the Old Red Courthouse.


Lake Avenue side of the first Hotel Racine

Lake Avenue side of the first Hotel Racine

Dennis Tully: This view looking South, is the “Lake Avenue Side” of the first Racine Hotel in the late 1800’s. There was a large porch for the hotel guests with a view of Lake Michigan (far left). The stone wall left of center runs along the South side of 6th St. (now the parking area in the rear of the Post Office Building). The buildings at upper left would be about the present location of Memorial Hall. The building behind the nearest post would be the location of McMynn School. It appears by the gathering of people in the background that there was some activity going on across Lake Avenue towards the lake.


Clem Larrin-Krivich‎:
The back of this photo says barber shop in Hotel Racine. Typical barber shop of the time. Probably early 1900teens. Spittoons on the floor. Embossed tin metal ceiling panels. Could be gas or electric ceiling light fixtures .
25 cents might have been the price of a haircut.

2 thoughts on “Hotel Racine

  1. I was a bartender at the Hotel Racine, around 1962, when one evening Glenway Wescott and Gilbert Seldes walked in and sat at a booth. Glenway Wescott was Wisconsin’s most famous (and best) living writer, and at that time I had written very little—a few stories, a poem or two—still unpublished but determined to become a writer. After I recognized him they came at sat at the bar so we could talk. A correspondence would ensue and GW later came to see me at the bookstore I was working at in San Francisco. At that time there was no grander place in Racine to drink, eat, and converse—and meet famous writers.

  2. I appreciate the interest and efforts Todd Wallace and others have invested in the history of Racine. They have encouraged me to read more and more history about the U.S. Europe is older but we have fascinating artifacts and stories here as well. Thanks so much.

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